12|26|07   A day out in the woods

Walking in our woods in Indiana

I spent a wonderful day out in our woods and fields yesterday. It’s extremely cold right now, but heartening. The sun is out almost every morning, and I feel very much at home in the vast expanse of the American mid-west.

It feels like a lifetime has gone by since I recorded this little idea:

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12|21|07   Lowell, Indiana: A note from home

A view from our veranda. There is snow everywhere, and the sun is refracting through the thin red petals of a flower. It is beautiful.

It’s true, I never thought the time would come, but I am now of an age where I belong to “those of a certain generation”. I guess I always thought that life would just make an exception for me, moving just a bit more slowly maybe, a bit more gently, protecting me, rather lovingly, a bit more kindly. Life, instead, has moved too quickly for my taste – and with more indifference, I might add. The many years have congealed into a single web, thin, and barely wide enough to cover my tracks.

I am so grateful to be home. I am so grateful to be home. So grateful…

MP3 Download: Theme and Variation 1 (192kb @ 2.5mb)
A tender interlude based on the song “We Might As Well Have Stayed Young”.

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12|21|07   NZ Musician review!

“Christchurch act The Enright House have been picked up by label arm A Low Hum, and with this debut have produced a beautifully crafted, sombre and atmospheric album. Melancholy pervades, the highlight for me being We Might As Well Have Stayed Young, an aching reflection on the passing of youth that those of a certain generation will no doubt relate to (“Listening to Skinny Puppy, we’d paint our ceilings black and tile our bathroom in mirror shards…”) – it’s become one of my favorite songs of the year.

The album is washed in lush arrangements; electronic elements mesh with drums, viola, piano, and guitars manipulated with bows, bottle caps and other assorted items. Instrumentals sit alongside the introspective lyrical contributions of Enright House founder Mark Roberts and the haunting poetry of Mary E. Jones. Light some candles, pour a glass of red wine and immerse yourself in this moody gem of an album.” • Renee Jones

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12|10|07   “It’s a Sonic Summer”: a free mp3 Compilation

It's a Sonic Summer: a music compilation of innovative New Zealand music, brought to you by Under The Radar

Under The Radar brings you: “It’s a Sonic Summer” – a free mp3 compilation of innovative New Zealand music.

Check out the full track-listing featuring all these amazing New Zealand artists:

  • Disateradio – “Computer Graphics”
  • The L.E.D.s – “Rumba”
  • Collapsing Cities – “In The Valley”
  • Cue The Sun – “15 4″
  • White On White – “Beta Dance”
  • Sora Shima – “Hovercraft”
  • The Enright House – “Scattering the Sun like Gunshot”

Visit Under The Radar’s download page to get your free compilation [33mb zip file].

And if you’re on the other side of the world, where currently it’s not at all summery, don’t fret, just think of it as a winter compilation. It’ll help keep you warm next to the open fire.

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12|10|07   The Lumiere Reader: Enright House feature and review

A screen-shot of the Lumiere Reader article

The Lumiere Arts Reader has just published a massive review/feature on us and the new album, giving us 4 out of 5 stars! Here’s a short excerpt of what Brannavan Gnanalingam has to say:

A Maze and Amazement LP is a beautiful album, complex and dense, but highly accessible. It’s a languid dream, shifting between melancholy and uplift, heavy on mood and texture. In other words, it could probably be described under the term “post-rock”, but there is so much happening here, it’s a little too reductive to try and sum it up in a term or two.

All this has resulted in a rather shimmering piece of work. A Maze and Amazement LP could be accused of over-extending itself at times (and potentially use a little trimming at points), but it’s ambitious and gorgeous to listen to. While approaching his music from an intellectual angle, it’s also a stirring piece of work, that reveals more and more to you every listen. Unlike say, Godspeed! You Black Emperor which thunderously document an apocalypse, this is much more personal, much more insular. “I think music that has a lot of heart in it, a lot of thought in it, can be beautiful and simple and still leave enough complexity for people to discover. And discovery takes time.”

The whole article can be found online at the Lumiere Reader’s website, but be forewarned: the feature is absolutely epic in length (over 2000 words)! Don’t get me wrong, I actually think this is the most interesting interview I’ve ever done in terms of the actual discussion, but don’t say I didn’t warn you about the length… even my Mom is going to have a tough time getting through this one! :)

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12|09|07   “Driving”: A song by Misfit Mod and The Enright House

My friend Sarah, aka Misfit Mod in a Kimono

Ever heard of Misfit Mod? Well you will. Count on it. Period.

Misfit Mod is my friend Sarah’s musical outlet, and honestly? everytime I listen to her music I get rediculously jeleous. Why? Because each and everyone of her songs is an earth-shattering revelation on just how much sonic and emotional depth can still be achieved within the bounds of popular music.

Anyhow, before Sarah moved to England a few months ago in order to start her music career, we actually spent a few hours one quiet night creating a song together, called “Driving”. I can’t remember who did what, but the two of us were knee-deep in synths, samplers and feedbacking guitars for most of the evening. And, after eventually taking turns at kicking each other out of the apartment, we both recorded a vocal line without the other person being allowed to hear it. In the end, we had two independent vocal lines, which, to our utter suprise, even worked well enough together to layer them over the top of each other at the end of the song.

Download the full 192 bit mp3:
The Enright House and Misfit Mod – Driving [3.3mb]

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